"Stochastic Processes and Applications Mongolia 2015" research school will be hosted by the National University of Mongolia. Situated in the capital city Ulan Bator, this event takes place at the very heart of Asia and is open to all. The two-week research school will look at an extensive programme of classical and contemporary topics from the theory of stochastic analysis, as well as its applications. There will be an extensive exposition covering the insertion of stochastics into biology, economics, random matrix theory, optimal stopping and control, combinatorial models, self-similarity and of course SDEs and PDEs. The fusion of activities during these two weeks will facilitate the emergence of new collaborations and opportunities for regional interaction.



Introduction

General structure:

Stochastic Analysis and its Applications Mongolian 2015 is a two-week event, consisting of minicourses and specialist topic lectures.

The minicourses form the core of the research school for local and regional participants, and will offer a basic, but precise introduction to key areas of current research. Principally they are aimed at Ph.D. students and young researchers as well as researchers wanting to move into these fields. The most important of these four courses is the first on stochastic calculus and this will receive 8 hours of lecturing whereas the others will receive 6 hours of lecturing.

In addition, there will be invited research seminars and lectures on research topics. The research topics will build on the minicourses giving further insight into current research areas of interest.

SPEAKERS:

Mini-courses

  1. Prof. Lisa Beck, (University of Augsburg, Germany): Introduction to PDEs.
  2. Prof. Jean Bertoin, (University of Zurich, Switzerland): Fragmentation-coalescence models and applications.
  3. Dr. Gaetan Borot, (Max Planck Institute Bonn, Germany): An Introduction to Random Matrix Theory.
  4. Prof. Maria-Emilia Caballero, (UNAM, Mexico): Introductory stochastic calculus and applications.
  5. Prof. Leif Döring, (University of Mannheim, Germany): Self-Similar Markov Processes.
  6. Prof. Ernst Eberlein, (University of Freiburg, Germany): Introductory models in mathematical finance.
  7. Prof. Bernt Oksendal, (University of Oslo, Norway): Stochastic control theory.

Topic lectures

  • Prof. Amaury Lambert (Paris VI and Collège de France): Random trees in evolutionary Biology
  • Dr. Erik Baurdoux (London School of Economics, UK) : Optimal stopping theory and applications
  • Dr. Juan Carlos Pardo (CIMAT, Mexico) : Levy processes
  • Dr. Christina Goldschmidt (Oxford University, UK) : Random trees
  • Dr. Anita Behme (Technische Universität München, Germany) : Time series in a nutshell

Research Seminars

The final list of speakers will be determined in due course.

Committee

School Coordinators

International Organizers

  • Dr. Erik Baurdoux (London School of Economics, UK)
  • Carina Geldhauser (Bonn University, Germany)

Local Organizers

  • Chair: Prof. Bayarmagnai Gombodorj (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Prof. Sarantuya Tsedendamba (MUST, Mongolia)
  • Assoc. Prof. Uuganbaatar Ninjbat (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Dr. Ganbat Atarsaikhan (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Assoc. Prof. Barsbold Bazarragchaa (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Dr. Tsogzolmaa Saizmaa (NUM, Mongolia)

Scientific Committee

  • Prof. Amaury Lambert (Paris VI and College de France)
  • Dr. Christina Goldschmidt (Oxford University, UK)
  • Prof. Andreas Kyprianou (University of Bath, UK)
  • Dr. Lea Popovic (Concordia University, Canada)
  • Prof. Bayarmagnai Gombodorj (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Prof. Dr. Chuluundorj Bekh-Ochir (NUM, Mongolia)
  • Dr. Otgonbayar Uuye (NUM, Mongolia)

Courses

In the following description, each unit of one hour corresponds to 45-50 minutes of lectures.

Mini-courses:

  1. Fragmentation-coalescence models and applications. (Prof. Jean Bertoin)

    The basic concept of exchangeable partitions of the natural numbers is introduced and how this plays a fundamental role in building Markov processes that are valued in the space of such partitions. The case of fragmentation and coalescent processes are developed with focus on their applications. In the case of fragmentation processes, applications in the mining industry are mentioned. In the case of coalescent processes, connections with modeling genetic diversification are mentioned.

  2. Introduction to PDEs. (Prof. Lisa Beck)

    In this course we discuss some basic results and techniques from the PDE theory, which arise in the study of stochastic differential equations. In this way, we provide some background for the course ”Introduction to stochastic calculus and applications”. We start with some fundamental properties of harmonic functions (i.e. of solutions to the Laplace equation), such as the mean value property, the maximum principle and Harnack’s inequality, which allow for a stochastic reformulation in terms of a stopped Brownian motion. We then present some variants for time-dependent PDEs, with an emphasis on the heat equation as model equation for general diffusion processes. Finally, we draw connections between partial differential equations and optimization / minimization problems, by explaining some basics of the Euler-Lagrange formalism. The theory covered in this course will be illustrated by several reoccuring examples, both during the lectures and tutorials.

  3. Introduction to Random Matrix Theory. (Dr. Gaetan Borot)

    Lecture 1. The N eigenvalues of a large symmetric (or hermitian) random matrix of size N are far from being independent random variables: they repel each other. This results in new limit laws of random variables, that can be computed in simple models of random matrices (the Gaussian ensembles), and turn out to be universal and appear as well in other domains of mathematics and physics.

    Lecture 2. We will discuss equilibrium measures and large deviation theory for eigenvalue statistics. I will then introduce Schwinger-Dyson equations -- which provide a general tool to study statistical physics models -- for some simple random matrix ensembles. I will describe some results about the large N asymptotic expansion, in particular the "topological expansions".

    (Choice will be made later between 3a. or 3b. depending on the time and audience' interest)

    Lecture 3a. We will see the machinery of Schwinger-Dyson equations at work, in the problem of obtaining finite size corrections to large deviations functions for the maximum eigenvalue of a random matrix. We will deduce an elementary and heuristic computation concerning the tails of the (universal) limit law of fluctuations of the maximum eigenvalue, which is called Tracy-Widom law.

    Lecture 3b. There is a rich combinatorics behind the Gaussian hermitian matrix model. It is described by "pairings": the large N limit isolates planar pairings, and the finite N corrections sort the pairings by their topology. This idea has been exploited in designing faster algorithms to predict the tertiary structure of RNA sequences.

  4. Introductory stochastic calculus and applications. (Prof. Maria-Emilia Caballero)

    This course will give an introduction to the theory of stochastic calculus and will serve as a foundation for the other mini-courses. The course will introduce Brownian motion as a Markov process and focus largely on the construction of the Brownian integral and its associated Ito calculus. En route examples of where stochastic calculus is important will be mentioned, leaving open the possibility for further discussion with students during the research school. The course will conclude with some attention given to the case of Lévy processes and the generalization of Ito’s calculus for this class of processes.

  5. Self-Similar Markov Processes. (Prof. Leif Döring)

    Positive Self-Similar Markov processes are closely connected to Lévy Processes. The aim of this lectures is to discuss a reformulation of Lamperti’s representation through stochastic differential equations (SDEs) driven by Poisson point processes. Lamperti’s representation is equivalent to the Lamperti SDE for positive initial conditions but in contrast to Lamperti’s representation the Lamperti SDE readily extends to zero initial conditions. On the way existence and uniqueness for jump-type SDEs will be discussed.

  6. Introductory models in mathematical finance. (Prof. Ernst Eberlein)

    This course will provide a rapid introduction into classical Black-Scholes theory and its deficiencies. The course will then move on to discussing a more modern perspective on financial modeling, drawing attention to the large variety in different types of financial contracts as well as the rich family of “off-the-shelf” stochastic processes and statistical methods, which are used to model such pricing scenarios. The ideology of using mathematics to establish “fair pricing” and giving a quantitative perspective to "risk exposure" will be central to the presentation. This course will be aimed equally at analysts from the several large banks in Mongolia as much as academic participants.

  7. Stochastic control theory. (Prof. Bernt Oksendal)

    Building on the first course on stochastic analysis, this course will introduce some basic principles of optimal stochastic control theory in the setting of models driven by Brownian motion and, more generally, Lévy processes. Two main solution methods will be presented, namely (i) the stochastic maximum principle and (ii) dynamic programming and the HJB equation. Applications that are of pertinence to mathematical finance will also be discussed, for example the problem of optimal portfolio choice and risk minimization in a financial market.

Topic lectures (2hrs each):

  1. Prof. Amaury Lambert (Paris VI and Collège de France): Random trees in evolutionary biology
    We will review some of the main models of random trees used in evolutionary biology to model gene trees or species trees. We will study the reconstructed tree, which is the tree spanned by alive individuals/species at the same fixed time, sometimes also called the coalescent tree. Time allowing, we will display two one-parameter families of binary random trees interpolating between the caterpillar tree on the one hand, and on the other hand the the maximally balanced tree, or the Kingman coalescent, respectively.
  2. Dr. Erik Baurdoux (London School of Economics, UK): Optimal stopping theory and applications
    We start with the classical secretary problem, where our aim is to choose the best candidate out of a number of applicants appearing in front of us in a random order, without having the option of going back to a previously rejected applicant. This example of an optimal stopping problem has been well studied and it allows us to illustrate in a rather simple setting some fundamental properties of more general optimal stopping problems. We will then move our attention to L ́evy processes, which form a surprisingly rich class and for example include Brownian motion and (compound) Poisson processes. In the general L ́evy setting we consider the well-known optimal stopping problem of the American put option as well as an optimal prediction problem where the aim is to approximate optimally the time at which a L ́evy process attains its maximal value. By studying these examples, we will also be touching on some important concepts from the general theory of optimal stopping.
  3. Dr. Christina Goldschmidt (Oxford University, UK): Random trees
    Tree structures are very common in nature, and we often want to model trees which are somehow randomly generated. In mathematics, we think of trees as connected graphs (or networks) with no cycles. In these lectures, I will discuss some simple models of random trees and what we can say about large instances of them. The first lecture will focus on Galton-Watson branching processes. We think of an idealised biological population (say of cells) in which each individual lives for a unit of time, gives birth to a random number of children (with a given distribution) and then dies. What can we say about the way the population size evolves? Or about the family tree of that population? In the second lecture, we will take a more combinatorial perspective. What does a tree with n vertices, chosen uniformly at random from all the possibilities, look like for large n? It turns out that we can use Galton-Watson branching processes to help us answer this question. Along the way, we will encounter several beautiful bits of combinatorics and probability, including Cayley’s formula, random walks and (finally) Brownian motion.
  4. Dr. Anita Behme (Technische Universität München, Germany): Time series in a nutshell
    In many scientific fields the data to be analyzed (e.g. meteorological data, stock prices, ...) form a sequence of observations given at a sequence of time points. Therefore, as counterpart to the stochastic processes in continuous time which are treated in several other courses of this school, this lecture introduces basic concepts of stochastic processes in discrete time, that is of time series. Here, our main focus will lie on introducing fundamental time series models which are widely used in practice and for which we will discuss some of their properties and possible applications.
  5. Dr. Juan Carlos Pardo (Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas A.C.): Levy Processes
    We will give a basic introduction to the theory of L ́evy processes. Our will be to cover the basic definition and construction of the general class. In particular using Poisson point processes, we give the classical Levy-Itˆo decomposition, showing how everyL ́evy process can be broken into the sum of three independent processes: a diffusive process, a compound Poisson process of ‘large’ jumps and a third process which arises as the limit (in an appropriate sense) of a sequence of compensated compound Poisson processes, which deals with up to a countable infinity of small jumps. We shall also mention various special cases of L ́evy processes as well as alluding to a variety of applications.

Research Seminars:

The final list of speakers will be determined in due course.

Contributed Talks

The final list of speakers and abstracts can be found here: abstracts.pdf

Poster Session

All participants are invited to present their current research in the school's poster session.

Posters should be in pdf format of which dimensions should correspond to A0 sized poster (1189 x 841 mm) in Portrait orientation and named as “SAAM_poster_SURNAME.pdf”.

To have your poster printed by the National University of Mongolia, they should be sent to Dr.Ganbat (LOC member) and Mrs. Oyunerdene (NUM math department's secretary) e-mail address: ganbat@num.edu.mn, ganbaa_1@yahoo.com, oyunerdene_n@num.edu.mn before JULY 20.

To include an abstract of you poster included in the book of abstracts of the school, please send a plain text email with your name, your affiliation and the abstract in (formulae in tex-code) to saam2015@uni-bonn.de.

Inspiration and online tutorials for posters can be found here: www.latextemplates.com/cat/conference-posters, homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/robert/posters/simple.html; in German: www.physik.uni-augsburg.de/theo3/Comp/hp750c/computing_hp750c_A0.en.shtml

Program

All lectures and contributed talks will be held in the Room 320 at 3rd floor, Main building, NUM. Registration and Opening Ceremony will be held in the Academic Hall (Round Hall) at 2nd floor, Main building, NUM.

Tentative Schedule:

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
08:00 - 08:30 Registration
08:30 - 09:00
09:00 - 09:30 Opening Ceremony Caballero
-
Lecture 3
Beck
-
Lecture 3
Bertoin
-
Lecture 3
Oksendal
-
Lecture 3
09:30 - 10:00 Caballero
-
Lecture 1
10:00 - 10.30
10.30 - 11.00 Break Break Break Break
11.00 - 11.30 Break Beck
-
Lecture 2
Oksendal
-
Lecture 1
Goldschmidt
-
Topic Lecture
Pardo
-
Topic Lecture
11:30 - 12:00 Bertoin
-
Lecture 1
12.00 - 12.30
12.30 - 13.00 Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
13.00 - 13.30 Lunch
13.30 - 14.00
14.00 - 14.30 Bertoin
-
Lecture 2
Excursion Oksendal
-
Lecture 2
Goldschmidt
-
Topic Lecture
14:30 - 15:00 Beck
-
Lecture 1
15:00 - 15.30
15.30 - 16.00 Break Break Break
16.00 - 16.30 Break Caballero
-
Lecture 4
Lambert
-
Topic Lecture
Baurdoux
-
Topic Lecture
16:30 - 17:00 Caballero
-
Lecture 2
17:00 - 17.30
17:30 - 18:00 Tutorials Tutorials Tutorials
18:00 - 18:30 Welcome Reception
18:30 - 19:00
19:00 - 19:30
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
08:00 - 08:30 Registration
08:30 - 09:00
09:00 - 09:30 Behme
-
Topic Lecture
Doering
-
Lecture 1
Eberlein
-
Lecture 3
Doering
-
Lecture 2
Borot
-
Lecture 3
09:30 - 10:00
10:00 - 10.30
10.30 - 11.00 Break Break Break Break Break
11.00 - 11.30 Eberlein
-
Lecture 1
Eberlein
-
Lecture 2
Borot
-
Lecture 1
Borot
-
Lecture 2
Doering
-
Lecture 3
11:30 - 12:00
12.00 - 12.30
12.30 - 13.00 Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
13.00 - 13.30
13.30 - 14.00
14.00 - 14.30 Remco van der Hofstad,
Kazumasa Kuwada
Fausto Gozzi,
Erdenebaatar Chadraa
Excursion Uuganbaatar Ninjbat,
Gantumur Tsogtgerel,
Ricardo Romo Romero
Kazutoshi Yamazaki,
Barsbold Bazarragchaa
14:30 - 15:00
15:00 - 15.30
15.30 - 16.00 Break Break Break Break
16.00 - 16.30 Kumiko Hattori,
Yanxia Ren
Studying in Germany
(Pannel discussion)

Poster Session and Reception
Yue Yuen Kwok,
Ju-Yi Jen
Josef Najundel,
Andrej Depperschmidt
16:30 - 17:00
17:00 - 17.30
17:30 - 18:00 Tutorials Tutorials Closing ceremony
18:00 - 18:30

Participants

ADINYA INI NIGERIA (NG) UNIVERSITY OF IDABAN
ADIYASUREN VANDANJAV MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
ALTANGEREL LKHAMSUREN MONGOLIA (MN) GERMAN MONGOLIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ALTANSUVD BAAJIIKHUU MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION
ARCEDE JAYROLD PHILIPPINES (PH) CARAGA STATE UNIVERSITY
ARIUNGEREL JARGAL MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
ARIUNTUYA NYAMSAMBUU MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BAASANJAV TUMUR MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY EXCHANGE
BAE JONGCHUN SOUTH KOREA (KR) SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERISTY
BALJINNYAM TSANGIA MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
BARSBOLD BAZARRAGCHAA MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BATSUURI D MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF HUMANITIES
BATTULGA GANKHUU MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BAURDOUX ERIK UNITED KINGDOM (GB) LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS
BAYARJARGAL BATSUKH MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BAYARMAGNAI GOMBODORJ MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BAYARSAIKHAN UUDUS MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BAYARTSETSEG SANDAGDORJ MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BECK LISA GERMANY (DE) UNIVERSITY OF BONN
BEHME ANITA GERMANY (DE) TECHNICAL UNIVERISTY OF MUNICH
BERTOIN JEAN SWITZERLAND (FR) ETH ZURICH
BLACQUE PIERRE UNITED KINGDOM (GB) IMPERIAL COLLEGE
BLAUT JULIA GERMANY (DE) JULIUS MAXIMILLIANS UNIVERSITY, WURZBURG
BOLOR TSERENDORJ MONGOLIA (MN) TENGER INSURANCE
BOLORCHULUUN CHOGSOM MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
BOROT GAETAN GERMANY (DE) MAX PLANCK INSITTUTE, BONN
BULGANTUNGALAG BATJARGAL MONGOLIA (MN) KHAAN BANK
BUYANTOGTOKH LHAGVA MONGOLIA (MN) SCHOOL NUMBER 11
CABALLERO MARIA-EMILIA MEXICO (MX) UNAM
CANIZARES GARCIA ANA GERMANY (DE) LMU MUNICH
CARPIO KRISTINE JOY PHILIPPINES (PH) DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY
CHU WEIJUAN CHINA (CN) NANJING UNIVERSITY
CHULUUNDORJ BEKH-OCHIR MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
CHULUUNTSETSEG L MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DAI JUN CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
DAVAASUREN CHULUUNBAATAR MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
DELGERMAA MAGSARJAV MONGOLIA (MN) DARKHAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
DEPERSCHMIDT ANDREJ GERMANY (DE) UNIVERSITY OF FRIEBURG
DI GIROLAMI CRISTINA ITALY (IT) UNIVERSITY OF PESCARA
DIECKMANN MARTIN GERMANY (DE) BIELEFELD UNIVERSITY
DIOP FATOU NÉNÉ SENEGAL (SN) ALIOUNE DIOP UNIVERISTY
DOERING LEIF GERMANY (DE) MANNHEIM UNIVERSITY
DONG YUCHAO CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
DORJSUNDUI GOMBOHURTS MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
EBERLEIN ERNST GERMANY (DE) UNIVERISTY OF FREIBURG
ERDENEBAATAR CHADRAA UNITED STATES (US) MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERISTY
ESENBEK KEREI MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
ESSAKY EL HASSAN MOROCCO (MA) CADI AYYAD UNIVERSITY
FAIZ FAIZULLAH PAKISTAN (PK) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
FISHKOV ALEXANDER RUSSIA (RU) ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
GANBAT ATARSAIKHAN MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
GANBAT BATMUNKH MONGOLIA (MN) OLONLOG SCHOOL
GANTUMUR TSOGTGEREL CANADA (CA) McGILL UNIVERSITY
GARRIDO MIGUEL ANGEL UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
GELDHAUSER CARINA GERMANY (DE) UNIVERSITY OF BONN
GERELMAA GERELT-OD MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
GERELTUYA BAYANMUNKH MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
GOLDSCHMIDT CHIRSTINA UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
GOZZI FAUSTO ITALY (IT) UNIVERISTY GUIDO CARLI
HÄPPÖLÄ JUHO SAUDI ARABIA (SA) KAUST
HATTORI KUMIKO JAPAN (JP) TOKYO METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY
HE HUI CHINA (CN) BEIJING NORMAL UNIVERSITY
HORTON EMMA UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF BATH
JAMIYANSHARAV BATCHULUUN MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
KHONGORZUL DASH MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
KIM SOJUNG SOUTH KOREA (KR) KAIST
KUMAR CHAMAN UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH
KUNTSCHIK ANDREA GERMANY (DE) FRANKFURT UNIVERSITY
KUWADA KAZUMASA JAPAN (JP) TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
KWOK YUE KUEN CHINA (CN), HONG KONG HKUST
KYPRIANOU ANDREAS UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF BATH
LALAOUI BEN CHERIF SIDI MOHAMED MOROCCO (MA) CADI AYYAD UNIVERSITY
LAMBERT AMAURY FRANCE (FR) Paris VI AND COLLEGE DE FRANCE
LOZANO TORRUBIA PABLO UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM
MA CHUNHUA CHINA (CN) NANKAI UNIVERSITY
MAKHGAL GANBOLD MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
MANDUKHAI OTGONBAATAR MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
MATETSKI KANSTANTSIN UNITED KINGDOM (GB) UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK
MAULIDI IKHSAN INDONESIA (ID) BOGAR AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY
MUNGUNSUKH SHIRNEN MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF HUMANITIES
MUNGUNTSETSEG ALTANTSETSEG MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
MUNKHDULAM ERDENEKHUYAG MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
MUNKHJARGAL BATKHUYAG MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
NAJNUDEL JOSEPH FRANCE (FR) PAUL SABATIER UNIVERISTY, TOULOUSE
NANZADRAGCHAA DAMBASUREN MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
NARANJARGAL PUREV-OCHIR MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
NAVCHAA TSERENDORJ MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
NIKITENKO ANTON AUSTRIA (AT) INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
NOBA KEI JAPAN (JP) KYOTO UNIVERSITY
OKSENDAL BERNT NORWAY (NO) UNIVERSITY OF OSLO
ORGIL BAT-ULZII MONGOLIA (MN) INSTITUTE OF FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
OTGONBAYAR UUYE MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
OYUN BATKHUYAG MONGOLIA (MN) TENGER INSURANCE
OYUNDELGER M MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
OYUNERDENE NARANKHUU MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
OYUNERDENE NAMSRAI MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
OYUNERDENE SELENGE MONGOLIA (MN) STATE BANK
PAN YUQING AUSTRALIA (AU) UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
PAPAGEORGIOU IOANNIS SWEDEN (SE) UPPSALA UNIVERSITY
PARDO JUAN CARLOS MEXICO (MX) CIMAT
PROKOPENKO EVGENY RUSSIA (RU) SOBOLEV INSTITUTE, NOVOSIBIRSK
PUREVSUREN DAMBA MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
PUREVTSOGT NUGJGAR MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
RANDRIAMANIRISOA SAHA HASINA MADAGASCAR (MG) UNVERSITY OF ANTANANARIVO
REN YANIXA CHINA (CN) PEKING UNIVERSITY
REZAPOUR MOHSEN IRAN (IR) UNIVERSITY OF KERMAN
ROMO ROMERO RICARDO FRANCE (FR) UNIVERSITY D'EVRY
SARANTUYA TSEDENDAMBA MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
SAVINKINA EKATERINA RUSSIA (RU) SOBOLEV INSTITUTE, NOVOSIBIRSK
SCHREITER MAXIMILIAN GERMANY (DE) LEIPZIG GRADUATE SCHOOL
SETIYOWATI SUSI INDONESIA (ID) BANDUNG INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
SONG YANG CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
SULISTIANINGSIH EVY INDONESIA (ID) TANJUNGPURA UNIVERSITY
SUMIYA BAASANDORJ MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION
SURYAWAN HERRY PRIBAWANTO INDONESIA (ID) SANATA DHARMA UNIVERSITY
TAIVANSAIKHAN TSETSENDELGER MONGOLIA (MN) NEW MONGOL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
TSERENBAT OIROV MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
TSOGZOLMAA SAIZMAA MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
TSUKADA HIROSHI JAPAN (JP) OSAKA CITY UNIVERSITY
TUMENBAYAR DAVAANYAM MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
UDOYE ADAOBI MMACHUKWU NIGERIA (NG) UNIVERSITY OF IDABAN
UNDARMAA ENKHBAYAR MONGOLIA (MN) TENGER INSURANCE
UNDRAM CHINGGIS MONGOLIA (MN)
UUGANBAATA NINJBAT MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
UUGANBAYAR SODNOM MONGOLIA (MN) STATE BANK
VAKEROUDIS STAVROS CYPRUS (CY) UNIVERSITY OF CYPRUS
VAN DER HOFSTAD REMCO NETHERLANDS (NL) TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF EINDHOVEN
WETZER ELISABETH AUSTRIA (AT) VIENNA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
WRESCH LUKAS GERMANY (DE) BIELEFELD UNIVERSITY
XU QING CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
YAMAZAKI KAZUTOSHI JAPAN (JP) KANSAI UNIVERSITY
YANG TING CHINA (CN) BEIJING INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
YEN JU-YI UNITED STATES (US) UNIVERSITY OF CINCINATI
YU LICHAO CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
ZAMANDII SANDAGDORJ MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
ZHUO YU CHINA (CN) FUDAN UNIVERSITY
ZOLBAYAR E MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
ZOLJARGAL MUNKHJARGAL MONGOLIA (MN) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MONGOLIA
ZORIGT CHOINKHOR MONGOLIA (MN) MONGOLIAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION

Dates and Venue

The school and the workshop will be held from July 27 to August 7, 2015 at Main Building, National University of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

The location of the National University of Mongolia is right in the heart of the Mongolian capital, Ulan Bator, a stone’s throw from the Mongolian Parliament and the central Chinggis Square. This is also a short walk from many cafes and restaurants as well as a number of large hotels, which offer services to western standards.

Sponsors

  • NUM, SAS

    NUM, SAS

    National University of Mongolia, School of Arts and Sciences
  • CIMPA

    CIMPA

    International Center for Pure and Applied Mathematics
  • DAAD

    DAAD

    German Academic Exchange Service
  • IMU

    IMU

    International Mathematical Union
  • MACE

    MACE

    Mongolian Agricultural Commodity Exchange
  • TENGER INSURANCE

    TENGER INSURANCE

    Tenger Insurance LLC
  • MUST

    MUST

    Mongolian University of Science and Technology

Accomodation

Hotel Name Category Single Room Double Room Distance to NUM
Puma Imperial Hotel *** 153.000 – up /tug/ *
or 78 – up /USD/
189.000 – up /tug/ *
or 96 – up /USD/ *
Next to NUM
Student dormitory ** Dormitory - 20.000–30.000 tug *
or 10-15 USD *
/Bed-in-4 or Bed-in-3/
15 minutes walking distance

* Special rates for the seminar
** It is in a 15 minute walking distance from NUM and newly built student dormitory. Here is the link of its opening ceremony which was one year ago (http://www.mminfo.mn/photoalbum/4441.shtml) and its prices are listed below. Conditions: One room with twin bunk-beds, a wardrobe, and a desk. Two triple-occupancy or two quad-occupancy rooms share a kitchenette and a bathroom with a shower and a toilet for 1 person. It has also an internet-access for every rooms and a washing machine for each floor free of charge. We have also asked about a possibility to use only below beds of the bunk bed and the dormitory organizer informally agreed that she may give us a chance to allow it without extra charge.

Room types Rates
1 Bedroom /200 rooms/ (quad occupancy, bed linens included and bath linens not included) 80000 tugrug (around $40)
1 Bedroom /16 rooms/ (triple occupancy, bed linens included and bath linens not included) 60000 tugrug (around $30)

Access to the venue is also possible by various other forms of public transportation as well.

In the vicinity of the venue, there are also several other accommodation alternatives (with varying quality and prices) which may be found through on-line hotel.

Other Accommodation Alternatives

Hotel Name Category Web Site
Ulaanbaatar Hotel ***** www.ubhotel.com
Best Western Premier Tuushin Hotel ***** www.bestwesternmongolia.mn
Chingis Khaan Hotel ***** www.chinggis-hotel.com
Kempinski Hotel Khan Palace ***** www.kempinski.com
Flower Hotel *** www.flower-hotel.mn

About Mongolia

Mongolia is truly one of the world's last undiscovered travel destinations and the safest country to visit. It is a land where you can experience wide-open spaces, cobalt blue skies, forests, deserts, crystal clear rivers and lakes, and the traditional hospitality of the nomads. Permanent dwellings are few and far between, fences even fewer and the land is owned by the people, like one large National Park.

As a tremendous destination to experience the outdoors, Mongolia also boasts of unique history dating back to the Mongol Empire of Genghis Khan. Simply put, it is a land of adventure, horses, nomads, and blue sky.

Population
2.8 million
Area
1,566,000 sq km (610,740 sq mi)
Land boundaries
8,158 km, with Russia 3,485 km and with China 4,673 km
Average altitude
1,580 m above sea-level
Terrain
Vast semi-desert and desert plains, mountains in west and southwest, Gobi Desert in southeast
People
Khalkha Mongols (86%), Kazaks (6%), about a dozen other Mongolian ethnic groups
Languages
Mongolian. English is widely spoken in the Ulaanbaatar.
Religions
Tibetan Buddhism, Muslim, Christian and Shamanism
Literacy rate
82.9%
Climate
Average summer temperature +20'C, average winter temperature -26'C, average rainfall 200-220 mm. Winter lasts from November to late April, Spring from May through June, Summer from July through September.
Political system
Parliamentary republic. President elected for four years. Present President Elbegdorj Tsahia, elected in 2009. Prime Minister appointed by State Great Khural for four years. Present Prime Minister Mr. Altanhyuag was appointed in 2012.
Legislature
State Great Khural (Parliament), unicameral with 76 members elected for four years. The last election was held in 2012.
Judicial system
Mongolian judicial system consists of Constitutional Court, Supreme Court, Aimag and capital city courts, soum and district courts.
State structure
Mongolia is a unitary state and divided administratively into Aimags (21) and a capital city; Aimags are subdivided into soums; soums into bags; and a capital city into districts; districts into khoroos.
National currency
Tugrik (MNT), about MNT 1780 = USD 1 (by April 2014)
Fiscal year
January 1 - December 31
Main entry points
Chinggis Khaan (airport in Ulaanbaatar ), Sukhbaatar (railway station on Mongolian-Russian border) and Zamyn Uud (railway station on Mongolian-Chinese border)
Sea access
Tianjin/China (1,344 km) and Nakhodka/Russia (4,037 km)
Public holidays
December 31- January 1 - New Year 3 days in January/February - Mongolian New Year (Tsagaan Sar), June 1 - Mother and Child day, July 11-13 - National Holiday (Naadam)
Time
Add 8 hours to Greenwich Mean Time
Normal working hours
09.00-13.00 and 14.00-18.00
Electric current
220 volts/50 HZ
Weight and measures
Metric System

Above information is adapted from www.discovermongolia.mn, for more information please visit the source webpage.

Useful Info

Personal Safety
Travelers to Mongolia should not be unduly concerned about their personal safety. As in every city, you should exercise normal safety precautions in Ulaanbaatar. Because of the risk of criminal activity, you should avoid walking alone at night. Watch out for pickpockets in public places such as an airport.
Climate
Mongolia is located in the Northern Hemisphere temperate zone. Situated at an average altitude of 1500 m above the sea level separated from the oceans, surrounded by high mountain chains that are blocking the wet winds, Mongolia has an extreme continental climate. Summer in Ulaanbaatar is relatively dry and continued from June through to September. The average summer temperature is +20C to +25C (during daytime) and +10C to +15C (during nighttime).
Currency
The Mongolian tugrug /tugrik, denoted by the code MNT, is the official currency of Mongolia. US dollars are often accepted, especially in Ulaanbaatar, but it is also useful to carry some cash in the local currency, the tugrik. 1USD=1780 tugrik /as of April 2014/. Any bank in Ulaanbaatar will be happy to exchange your currency, as will most of the hotels you will stay in.
Electricity
Electrical current is 220 volts; 50Hz. European two-pin plugs are standard.
Time
Local time is GMT +8.

Visa and travel information

On a behalf of the research school an official letter of invitation will be forwarded to participants upon receiving their registration forms so that they could apply for a visa at the Mongolian Embassy in their country.

Within the framework of the 100 days of the intensification of economy the Government of Mongolia approved a list of 42 countries with a visa free access to Mongolia. According to this decision nationals of these countries are entitled with the visa-free stay for up to 30 days for tourist and short business trips from June 25, 2014 till 31st December 2015.

The list includes the following countries: Republic of Austria, Principality of Andorra, Argentine Republic, Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Kingdom of Belgium, Republic of Bulgaria, Federative Republic of Brazil, Hellenic Republic, Gibraltar(Overseas territory of the United Kingdom), Grenada, Kingdom of Denmark, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Republic of Iceland, Kingdom of Spain, Italian Republic, Republic of Ireland, Republic of Cyprus, Republic of Costa Rica, Republic of Latvia, Republic of Lithuania, Principality of Liechtenstein, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Republic of Malta, Principality of Monaco, Kingdom of the Netherlands, Kingdom of Norway, Republic of Panama, Republic of Poland, Portuguese Republic, Romania. Slovak Republic, Republic of Slovenia, Hungary, Oriental Republic of Uruguay, Republic of Finland, French Republic, Republic of Croatia, Czech Republic, Republic of Chile, Kingdom of Sweden, Swiss Confederation, Republic of Estonia.

More extensive visa free entry list found here: http://mongolianembassy.us/list-of-countries-and-regions-with-no-visa-2

Nevertheless, Mongolian diplomatic missions abroad will continue issuing visas to nationals of the 42 countries to provide smooth entrance through international borders unless the relevant authorities of the countries confirm the database update.

For more information, please visit following sites:

If there is no Mongolia embassy in your country, one month visas can be obtained on the spot once you arrive at the airport or railway station.

You can reach Ulaanbaatar by planes from

  • Germany (Berlin)
  • Russia (Moscow and Irkutsk)
  • Japan (Tokyo and Osaka)
  • Korea (Seoul)
  • China (Beijing)

You also can take trains from Russia and China.

In Ulaanbaatar, there is one airport "Chinggis Khan" for international flights and the main railway station "Ulaanbaatar". All participants will be picked up at the airport or railway station. We also organize your transfer to Airport upon your departure.

We remind you that July is the most busy tourist season for Mongolia, so we recommend you to book your flights and apply for a visa as early as possible.